10 things in tech you need to know today

ALEX EDELMAN/AFP/Getty Images Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Monday. Google suspended some business with Huawei after Trump blacklisted the company. Huawei will immediately lose access to updates to the Android operating system, and coming versions of its smartphones outside of China will also lose access to popular Google apps. US chipmakers including Intel and Qualcomm have also starting severing business with Huawei. Huawei is rumored to have stockpiled chips to last for at least three months, Bloomberg reports. Former Y Combinator CEO Sam Altman gave an interview to TechCrunch two months after stepping down as president of the famous startup incubator. Altman said he has "no idea" how OpenAI, the AI company whose cofounders include Elon Musk, will make money. uBiome's founder repeatedly presented herself as years younger than she was, in the latest sign of trouble at the embattled $600 million poop-testing startup. The buzzy Silicon Valley startup uBiome, which was geared toward highlighting the importance of the microbiome for human health, is under federal investigation. Google is using its famously sparse homepage to brag about how much it helps the economy. On Friday, Google began promoting reports which show stats like how many billions of dollars the tech giant has helped generate and how many hundreds of thousands of businesses have leveraged its ad tools. Fortune spoke to 32 current and former Google employees about cultural shifts and clashes within the company. Its report touches on internal upheavals like the Pentagon's defense programme Project Maven and the mass walkout. Apple CEO Tim Cook urged college grads to "push back" against algorithms that promote the "things you already know, believe, or like." Speaking during a commencement speech at Tulane University on Saturday, Cook also encouraged students to pay attention to "what we owe one another" and touched on the importance of addressing climate change. A month after layoffs, Udacity's famous founder Sebastian Thrun says the online school expects to do $100 million in revenue this year. Thrun told Business Insider the layoffs were not from financial struggle, but rather from a strategic change that made a good chunk of the full-time staff unnecessary. Prince Harry won a legal battle with the paparazzi using Europe's GDPR privacy law. Prince Harry won a legal dispute with Splash News, a photo agency which used a helicopter to take pictures inside his home. Jack Ma says he will go back to teaching when he retires from Alibaba this September. Ma said that he still considered himself to be young and that he wanted to spend another 15 years in the education sector. Have an Amazon Alexa device? Now you can hear 10 Things in Tech each morning. Just search for "Business Insider" in your Alexa's flash briefing settings.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Facial recognition is almost perfectly accurate — here's why that could be a problemSee Also:10 things in tech you need to know today10 things in tech you need to know today10 things in tech you need to know today